Some Stuff I've Worked On

About This List

Here’s a sampling of projects I’ve been involved in over the years. This list only has websites that I built from scratch, or that were built from scratch by a team I was on. A lot of the work I do (a lot of the work most web developers do) is maintenance — tweaks and adjustments, adding and removing features, upgrading themes and applications to work in new software releases, handling security issues and recovery when security has failed and a site has been hacked.

I’m happy to share what I know about specific projects, applications, and technologies, so drop a line to steve@steveclason.com if you have any questions.

 

Herald Square Hotel

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This WordPress site was ordinary-looking when I first saw it, but the designers at InciteResponse perked things up with some subtle, but important, revisions. A smaller header, better navigation, and improved image selection made a huge difference in the site’s appearance and usability across all device-widths. Revising a theme can be difficult and time-consuming (therefore expensive), but MediaTemple’s “Staging Sites” feature takes a lot of the work out of it by quickly enabling a development domain so you don’t have to worry about breaking the site. Well, you don’t have to worry until late in the process — going live with changes is always stressful.(read more )

Serrano Hotel

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This WordPress site was designed and developed several years ago. I don’t know who did the initial work. If I did I would give them credit here — the site is well-built and very attractive. But it was build using a device-adaptive strategy which used a sniffer to determine if the user arrived via a mobile or a desktop device then serving content appropriately. There was nothing wrong with that approach at the time, but now, a few years later, a device-responsive strategy is considered a best practice, for maintenance reasons and, maybe more importantly, for SEO reasons.(read more )

Comanche Nation Entertainment

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This blog, shared by four Comanche Nation casinos, was the first project I did in collaboration with my (now) frequent partners, the online marketing agency InciteResponse. The site was designed to serve all four casinos with a frequently updated blog and the tricky part, from a development standpoint, was to manage the casino icons with their associated arrow graphics in both desktop and mobile screen sizes. (read more )

Jasper’s Corner Tap

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A beautiful site (I didn’t design it) with the salient feature being the large, auto-scrolling image carousel on the home page and the fixed header and footer. A lot of JavaScript keeps all that working, and those scripts, together with all the images, could bog the performance down, but the site loads pretty quickly because of a good Content Delivery Network and some image optimization..(read more )

Gateway Park Fun Center

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Gateway Park Fun Center

This fun project for an outdoor family recreation park, created in May 2014, was done to create a mobile-friendly layout to accommodate the 52% of the visitors viewing the site on phones or tablets, while preserving high search-engine rankings earned over the years. To keep the resource-demands low we used JavaScript only where it was needed, enhancing the user experience with careful navigation options and striking graphics.(read more )

Hillcrest Asset Management

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Hillcrest Asset Management

Another WordPress site, built to last. A custom theme with some fancy DOM manipulation made this an interesting project, but the important part from the customer standpoint is that the site is easily maintained, scalable, and build on a popular platform with frequent security updates, and a site that preserves their careful branding efforts.(read more )

State of the States in Cognitive Disabilities

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State of the States in Cognitive Disabilities is a “sister institution” of the Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities — they share office space and there is some staff overlap. I build their original website for them 10 years or so ago, migrated that static site to Joomla some years later, then in 2011 we added a significant and popular new custom charting feature.(read more )

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute

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This site was built in 2011 on the Joomla platform, using a custom template and several custom modules in order to achieve the complex functionality that the client required. The intention was to build it so that the site could be scaled up to deliver thousands of documents, an intention that provided the biggest design challenge — bigger, even, than the custom Joomla modules.

This was the first (and one of the few) Joomla site I've worked on that required more than one template. Differences in one section of the site were causing the main template to become unmanageably complicated, so we built and deployed another for a few pages, despite the added maintenance load that causes.

I see that although the site remains in Joomla, the template has been revised since I worked on it last.

Superior Chamber of Commerce

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We had built the Joomla! site earlier, but in 2010 we integrated the site with data from a company called ChamberMaster, which provides membership software specifically for Chambers of Commerce. While we were at it, we made a separate mobile version, largely using ChamberMaster components, with a device-detector to re-direct visitors depending on the device they were using to view the site.(read more )

Glenn Frank Engineering

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Built in 2009, this was near the last site I did without using a CMS (Content Management System). Using the Dreamweaver/Contribute platform, the user has been able to add new content so the platform is solid, but newer sites have all used some CMS — at first FarCry, a CMS based on ColdFusion, more recently Joomla! and, more often now, WordPress.(read more )

City of Boulder, Colorado

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Boulder, Colorado (where I live) passed some election finance laws in 2008 and hired my friends Cam Marshall and Bob McCool at ArielMIS to create a database to track and report on campaign contributions and expenditures. They contracted with me to write the application after Cam created the database.(read more )

Throughline Productions

I build this site in December, 2006, on a Dreamweaver/Contribute platform. So, is’t a static site with some semi-automated content management support. A WYSIWYG editor, for instance, which in 2006 was awful. I haven’t touched this site since I built it and it’s only included here because it may be the last table-based layout I did that’s still standing.(read more )

The Coleman Institute For Cognitive Disabilities

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The Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities

I was hired to build the first website for this University of Colorado Institute primarily because of my interest in and experience with accessibility issues. We build the site with Dreamweaver and a staff-member maintained it — my part, initially, was to build the template and to create a custom bibliographic database with PHP and MySQL. At the time, the site was tested by outside auditors and found to meet the highest standards of web accessibility.(read more )

Finberg Law

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This site began life in 2004 as a static, table-based layout and a few times a year they asked for a content change, which, in the old days of static html, required either a developer or a very knowledgeable user to handle without breaking anything. Those were times when the term “Webmaster” meant a real collection of skills, but as web-technology rolled forward, high-quality, low-cost content management systems allowed less technically proficient users to manage their site with only occaissional help from a developer.(read more )